Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography

Abelardo Morell, born 1948 in Havana, Cuba is a Boston-based photographer.
Morell and his family fled Cuba in 1962, moving to New York City. Morell earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Bowdoin College in 1977, and a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University School of Art in 1981. He received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Bowdoin in 1997.

Morell is well known in the photographic community for creating camera obscura images in various places around the world and photographing these.
He has received a num­ber of awards and grants, which include a Cin­tas grant in 1992 a Guggen­heim fel­low­ship in 1994 a Rap­pa­port Prize in 2006 and an Alturas Foun­da­tion grant in 2009 to pho­to­graph the land­scape of West Texas. He was the recip­i­ent of the Inter­na­tional Cen­ter of Pho­tog­ra­phy 2011 Infin­ity award in Art.

His work has been col­lected and shown in many gal­leries, insti­tu­tions and muse­ums, includ­ing the Museum of Mod­ern Art, The Whit­ney Museum of Amer­i­can Art, the Met­ro­pol­i­tan Art Museum in New York, The Chicago Art Insti­tute, The San Fran­cisco Museum of Mod­ern Art, The Hous­ton Museum of Art, The Boston Museum of Fine Art, The Vic­to­ria & Albert Museum and over sev­enty other muse­ums in the United States and abroad. A ret­ro­spec­tive of his work orga­nized jointly by the Art Insti­tute of Chicago, The Getty and The High Museum in Atlanta will be on view start­ing in the sum­mer of 2013.

His pub­li­ca­tions include a pho­to­graphic illus­tra­tion of Alice’s Adven­tures in Won­der­land (1998) by Dut­ton Children’s Books, A Cam­era in a Room (1995) by Smith­son­ian Press, A Book of Books (2002) and Cam­era Obscura (2004) by Bulfinch Press and Abelardo Morell (2005), pub­lished by Phaidon Press. Recent pub­li­ca­tions include a lim­ited edi­tion book by The Museum of Mod­ern Art in New York of his Cliché Verre images with a text by Oliver Sacks.

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

Conceptual Photography by Abelardo Morell

*** The camera obscura is an optical device that projects an image of its surroundings on a screen.
It is used in drawing and for entertainment, and was one of the inventions that led to photography and the camera.
The device consists of a box or room with a hole in one side. Light from an external scene passes through the hole and strikes a surface inside, where it is reproduced, upside-down, but with color and perspective preserved. The image can be projected onto paper, and can then be traced to produce a highly accurate representation.
The largest camera obscura in the world is on Constitution Hill in Aberystwyth, Wales.
Using mirrors, as in the 18th-century overhead version (illustrated in the History section below), it is possible to project a right-side-up image.

Another more portable type is a box with an angled mirror projecting onto tracing paper placed on the glass top, the image being upright as viewed from the back.
As the pinhole is made smaller, the image gets sharper, but the projected image becomes dimmer. With too small a pinhole, however, the sharpness worsens, due to diffraction.
Some practical camera obscuras use a lens rather than a pinhole because it allows a larger aperture, giving a usable brightness while maintaining focus.
– Wikipedia

Abelardo Morell

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