Michael Oswald

Michael Oswald

Beyond Imagination

Michael Oswald is a professional digital artist from Central California.
His imaginative use of post-production software has garnered him quite a following, as most of his artwork — which exhibits a captivating blend of futuristic and classical motifs — is accomplished using photo-manipulation software.

The creation of Michael’s artwork starts by taking up to 100 reference pictures until he gets a perfect shot which is then processed in Photoshop and 3D Max.
He uses just a few Photoshop tools like blurring, airbrushing and smudging to paint over the top of the image in order to make it look like a painting.

Mr Oswald, who also calls himself Michael O, said on his website:
“With the exception of the original digital photograph, my work is created entirely on a computer utilizing my knowledge of digital techniques and the traditional art skills I learned in my younger days.
‘I consider the ‘concept’ to be the best part of my work so I put a lot of thought into it and I try not to hold back from expressing myself.”

His work has been featured on several covers of Advanced Photoshop magazine, as well as various book covers for Macmillan and Little Brown & Company publishing.

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

Artwork by Michael Oswald

TIPS FOR ASPIRING ARTISTS

For those who are hoping for a career in digital art,

this is the Michael Oswald advice:

– I would first recommend honing your traditional art skills before making the transition to digital. Traditional art is the foundation of digital art. Like a paintbrush, Photoshop is just a tool and not a miracle worker. The knowledge you gain from traditional rules (like composition) will pay off when it comes time to go digital.
– For program learning, I would recommend The Gnomon Workshop collection of DVD tutorials. They have plenty of step-by-step lessons focusing on all aspects of digital art. But, if you are more like me and not interested in this teaching method, I would recommend a few years of trial and error and a lot of elbow grease!
– Practice, practice, practice! After almost a decade in this field, I am still developing as an artist and learning new skills thanks to practice.
– Gain exposure by getting your work into as many community-based websites as possible.
You never know who might see your work there. That is actually where most of my clients first saw my work.

– For commissioned work, do not miss deadlines.
– Have an understanding of modern business practices and communication. Skill in art is only half the battle.
– Do not expect to get rich by selling your work in print form. With digital art there is no actual original piece of art so the best you can do is sell prints or merchandise which is much more limited than other art mediums.
Doing commissioned work has been far more lucrative in my experience.
– Lastly, find your own style that suits your artistic desires.
I do not believe I would have any satisfaction with my own art if people told me that it looked just like someone else’s.

“Talent is a gift. Success is a decision”
Michael Oswald

Michael Oswald

Official Website