Guangjian Huang

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Art | Design | Photography

Today’s Subject

Digital Art

Inspirational Stream

Art | Design | Photography | Architecture

  • Food Photography Tips
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    Food Photography Tips

    Food photography is definitely one of those genres where less is more. With portraits, cars, and interior architecture, for example, we can keep adding more and more light until we have it shaped perfectly for our needs. Add a kicker. Throw in a little more fill. Craft the light and direct the shadows. With food photography, however, making the food the star is usually a matter of carefully selecting a single large, diffused light source. Before you click over to B&H or Adorama in search of the biggest soft box you can find, take a few minutes to check out your windows. Nine times out of ten, a simple window will be all you need to create beautifully diffused back or side light. Lighting from the back or side will create dimension and highlight the textures in the food. As a portrait photographer, I found this to be a little counter-intuitive when I first started shooting food. Even though we CAN take stunning portraits with just one light, adding a fill light to soften the shadows or background lights to create separation is very common. Not so with food. The best light for food photography is the light they won’t even notice when they look at the photos. We want it as natural as possible. That’s one of the reasons why window light works so well. It also means, though, that there are going to be naturally occurring shadows. If you feel they need to be softened, or that some fill is necessary, use a bounce card..
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  • Food Photography Tips and Tricks (2)
    Food Photography Tips and Tricks (3)
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    Easy Tips for Photographing Food

    Taking great photographs of food is a hard-earned skill—after all, that's why some people are lucky enough to get paid for it. But it's also a lot easier to hone these days, no matter who you are; even a smartphone can yield gorgeous, high-quality images. Sure, professional cameras and lenses—provided you know how to use them—can make taking a great photo easier, but they're by no means necessary to the process. Just think of all the amazing Instagram feeds out there. What separates magazine-worthy photos from their less impressive counterparts isn't a fancy camera or expensive equipment. It's an understanding of what it takes to compose an appealing image and the confidence to execute your vision.
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  • 37-photosho-retouching-tutorials
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    50 Portrait Retouching Tutorials

    Is it something that often happens to you? You just sit and keep on looking through your photos on the computer screen trying to take a closer look at your full-size pictures. And then it occurs to you that they didn’t really suck that much during the actual shoot? Of course, what you see during the shoot with your eyes and what you get after the photo session is not the same thing. But do not let your despair take possession of you! Photoshop will save the world with its advanced tools to smooth out skin and hair, optimize body proportions and emphasize some details with this fantastic tutorials.
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  • 52-photo-ideas-photography-projects-for-2016-indoor-splash-shots-1
    52-photo-ideas-photography-projects-for-2016-smoke-art-2
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    52 Photography Projects

    Taking on a photography project is a great way to get yourself out of a photography rut and to bring some focus to your picture-taking. Placing some constraints on what you're going to take photos of or what camera gear you'll use really does force you to become more creative, too.
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  • Blossoms on a plum tree Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
    How To Take Charge Of Depth of Field In Your Photography (3)
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    How To Take Charge Of Depth of Field In Your Photography

    Understanding how to control depth of field in your photographs is one way to take creative control of your images. When an image has a large depth field it means that everything from the foreground to the background is in focus. A shallow depth of field is when only a portion of the image is in focus. This can mean anything from the background being slightly soft to only a razor thin slice of the image being sharp. As an artist you don’t always want your images to appear exactly as your eye saw the scene. You want to draw the viewer’s eye to something in particular, to emphasize one thing over another in an image.
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  • Civet Musk (1)
    Civet Musk (2)
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    Logo and Poetry by Civet Musk

    Typography is the art and technique of arranging type to make written language legible, readable, and appealing when displayed. The arrangement of type involves selecting typefaces, point size, line length, line-spacing (leading), letter-spacing (tracking), and adjusting the space within letters pairs (kerning).
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  • Aquarelle by Adrien Donot
    Aquarelle by Adrien Donot
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    Aquarelle by Adrien Donot

    French digital artist. Technology enthusiast at XXII Creative, a french digital studio in love with tech+art.
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  • Conceptual Art by Moisés Martín Navas
    Conceptual Art by Moisés Martín Navas
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    Conceptual Art by Moisés Martín Navas

    Moisés Martín Navas aka Dumaker is a 33 year old graphic designer / illustrator currently living and working in Albacete, Spain.
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Projects

Art | Design | Photography | Architecture | Media

  • Noah and Daniel

    The creative Vogue’s photographers Noah and Daniel came up with this fantastic idea to take a portrait sat of the…

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  • Murat Sayginer

    Murat Saygıner is a visionary artist who works in the fields of art photography and computer graphics, and is also…

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  • Jessica Hische

    Daily Drop Cap is a project by designer and illustrator Jessica Hische. Since September of 2009, an illustrative initial cap…

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  • Catherine Nelson

    The capacity for fearlessness of the creative facility is always something astonishing. Joseph Chilton Pearce, the human development specialist..

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  • Anais Boileau

    Anais Boileau is a French illustrator and art director based in Paris. Her WWF/Botanimal project published on these pages, a…

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